The Lesson from Standing Rock: Organizing and Resistance Can Win

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Indigenous water protectors and their allies celebrate that the Army Corps of Engineers has denied an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline on December 4, 2016. (Reuters / Lucas Jackson)

Indigenous water protectors are showing us how to fight back—and how to live again.

By Naomi Klein at The Nation

Indigenous water protectors and their allies celebrate that the Army Corps of Engineers has denied an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline on December 4, 2016. (Reuters / Lucas Jackson)
Indigenous water protectors and their allies celebrate that the Army Corps
of Engineers has denied an easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline on
December 4, 2016. (Reuters / Lucas Jackson)

“I’ve never been so happy doing dishes,” Ivy Longie says, and then she starts laughing. Then crying. And then there is hugging. Then more hugging.

Less than two hours earlier, news came that the Army Corps of Engineers had turned down the permit for the Dakota Access Pipeline to be built under the Missouri River. The company will have to find an alternate route and undergo a lengthy environmental assessment.

Ever since, the network of camps now housing thousands of water protectors has been in the throes of (cautious) celebration and giving thanks, from cheers to processions to round dances. Here, at the family home of Standing Rock Tribal Councilman Cody Two Bears, friends and family members who have been at the center of the struggle are starting to gather for a more private celebration.

Which is why the dishes must be done. And the soup must be cooked. And the Facetime calls must be made to stalwart supporters, from Gasland filmmaker Josh Fox to environmental icon Erin Brockovich. And the Facebook live videos must, of course, be made. Hawaii Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard—here as part of a delegation of thousands of anti-pipeline veterans—is on her way over. (“Exhilarated,” is how she says she feels when she arrives.) CNN must, of course, be watched, which to the amazement of everyone here gives full credit to the water protectors (while calling them “protesters”).

Read more at The Nation

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