Olanike Alabe, Renee Collymore and “Reality Check 2010”

0
213
One Perspective …
Olanike Alabe, Renee Collymore and “Reality Check 2010”
Many Americans have settled for the television reality show as a reflection of real life.  They also measure their own lives by the reality-show lives of the so-called real people who are “acting out” for the ever-present camera.  It’s the old Shakespeare line unplugged or reinvented:  “All the World’s a Stage.  All the people merely players.”
Yet, it’s more than entertainment here. The housewives, Snookie, The Situation and ilk  act out  because they can leverage “reality” as a way to push their cause and make behind-the-scenes big bucks.
So Dear Ola Alabi and Renee Collymore, you ladies appear to have played out your drama  in a  recent spate of derogatory emails, gossip-girl strategy tactic-antics,  name-calling, public displays of animosity.
The media, the internet, and the public arena are not the places to show Extreme Hubris or Angst especially when you’re in public office or running for or from something. The public can pick out – and will – every wart, mole, incompetency.
For examples of what to do and how to act, there are many — all role models from whom you can learn that activism and argument do  not preclude altruism; you can galvanize a public with grace as much as you can with gaucheness, and in defeat there can be victory; from victory, loss.
You can sit at the feet of Anna Jefferson and Elsie Richardson, founders of Medgar Evers College (see the cover) and learn more about politics and campaigning in one hour than in four years at Harvard.
But you, certainly need not look too far for role models. Nor for education.
Ladies, they happen to be right by your sides —  your dynamic and wonderful mothers.
But while you’re rediscovering what you probably already have been taught, here’s some advice:  Learn from yours and others’ mistakes, but don’t cast fault or aspersion; enjoy successes, but do not think it’s all about you.  If you’ve decided to stay in the public eye, act your best selves, but try not to act out unless it’s for the benefit for your family and community.
And remember,  it’s just an election.  You’ll always have a chance to do it again.
-Bernice Elizabeth Green

One Perspective …
Olanike Alabe, Renee Collymore and “Reality Check 2010”
Many Americans have settled for the television reality show as a reflection of real life.  They also measure their own lives by the reality-show lives of the so-called real people who are “acting out” for the ever-present camera.  It’s the old Shakespeare line unplugged or reinvented:  “All the World’s a Stage.  All the people merely players.”
Yet, it’s more than entertainment here. The housewives, Snookie, The Situation and ilk  act out  because they can leverage “reality” as a way to push their cause and make behind-the-scenes big bucks.
So Dear Ola Alabi and Renee Collymore, you ladies appear to have played out your drama  in a  recent spate of derogatory emails, gossip-girl strategy tactic-antics,  name-calling, public displays of animosity.
The media, the internet, and the public arena are not the places to show Extreme Hubris or Angst especially when you’re in public office or running for or from something. The public can pick out – and will – every wart, mole, incompetency.
For examples of what to do and how to act, there are many — all role models from whom you can learn that activism and argument do  not preclude altruism; you can galvanize a public with grace as much as you can with gaucheness, and in defeat there can be victory; from victory, loss.
You can sit at the feet of Anna Jefferson and Elsie Richardson, founders of Medgar Evers College (see the cover) and learn more about politics and campaigning in one hour than in four years at Harvard.
But you, certainly need not look too far for role models. Nor for education.
Ladies, they happen to be right by your sides —  your dynamic and wonderful mothers.
But while you’re rediscovering what you probably already have been taught, here’s some advice:  Learn from yours and others’ mistakes, but don’t cast fault or aspersion; enjoy successes, but do not think it’s all about you.  If you’ve decided to stay in the public eye, act your best selves, but try not to act out unless it’s for the benefit for your family and community.  And remember,  it’s just an election.  You’ll always have a chance to do it again. -Bernice Elizabeth Green